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YOU ARE BEAUTIFUL
the-more-u-knowMy name is Skyler I am 28/M I live in Utah USA for the time being I am very active I compete in MMA and train about 12 hours a week. I created this blog because I love health and wellness information. I am a student of health and wellness and will be my whole life. **Dont get mad at me if I post something wrong, please do the human thing and message me correcting me of my mistake so I can learn from it** Thats why I have this blog, to learn and share health and wellness information.

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About my Blog

I am a health and wellness blog that mainly posts health and wellness information posts. Sometimes I post non health related posts but it's not the norm.

If you are inspired by information to reach your health and wellness goals like I am then maybe we would be a good fit :)

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1. Develop healthy emotional eating habits.One of the biggest myths about emotional eating is that it’s prompted by negative feelings. Yes, people often turn to food when they’re stressed out, lonely, sad, anxious, or bored.It’s no accident that McDonald’s named their kids deal a Happy MealBut emotional eating can be linked to positive feelings too! It’s no accident that McDonald’s named their kids deal a “Happy Meal”! They do this to form a lifelong emotional bond between being happy and eating at McD’s, and it works!You can beat the fast food marketing guru’s at their own game. Simply swap out the fast food and replace it with a fun day at the Farmers Market! Do this on a regular basis and your kids will start to equate healthy real food with those happy family days at the market.Here’s another solution from the Snack-Girl Blog2. Connect kids with “real food”There is a huge disconnect between most Americans and their food. For the most part, we’ve stopped questioning where our food comes from, how it is raised and if it is good for our health. To a large extent, this is why our supermarkets shelves are lined with so many boxes of processed junk. And most of it is Genetically Modified (GMOs). We are the ones buying it so they keep making it!We can break that cycle with our kids and the Farmers Market provides a great opportunity to further the food connection discussion. It’s much more effective when you practice what you preach. Buying from local sustainable farmers reinforces the message.Want to get involved with stopping GMOs? Take a look at March against Monsanto3. Talk with real farmersAs you know, kids are naturally curious. This is a good match because farming is really amazing. Think about it: plant seeds in dirt, add water, get vegetables! Of course there’s a lot more to it than that.As we mentioned above, a lot of the farmers we meet are very proud of the work they do and they’re very happy to talk about it. With a little coaching (if necessary) you’re kids can ask some great questions, like- Why are you a farmer? What’s your favorite things to grow? What’s that hardest thing to grow? The easiest? Do you use chemicals or pesticides? Why, or why not?A cool side-effect of this is that the next time you go to the market your kids will remember the farmers. It’s great to make new friends, especially when their doing something as important as growing your food.4. Let them buy their own foodif we really want to teach our kids about the value of real food, they should know how to shop for itDepending on your kids age(s), give them a few bucks to buy some of their own food to bring home. This in itself is a great learning experience. Will they think long and hard about what to buy? Or will they buy the first thing they see? Learning to shop wisely and consider all the options is a great skill to have.And let’s be honest, if we really want to teach our kids about the value of real food, they should know how to shop for it!PS- If you have young kids, instead of actually shopping maybe you can just let them give the money to farmer. Little kids (and the farmer) will probably enjoy this!5. Cook the food you bought at homeGetting kids involved in cooking is great. Basic cooking skills open so many choices for them later in life and alleviate them of the need to buy ready made, highly processed meals. But it’s not always easy.Cooking the food you just bought, or the food THEY just bought if you followed the step above, makes this a whole lot easier. It’s the next logical step- “We bought these veggies from the nice farmer, now we get to cook them!”For meal ideas, check out our friends at Clean Eating Recipes6. Introduce new foodsFace it, some kids are just picky eaters. The 3 steps above may have a profound effect on their willingness to even TRY something new, right? Let’s go through this- We met the farmer, learned about how they grew this, we bought it, we took it home and now we cooked it. It’s just natural to want to taste it!For some menu inspiration follow our friends at Just Eat Real Food7. Learn about nutritionteach them why nutrients will make them better athletesFor older kids, the Farmers Market provides an opportunity to learn about nutrition and why real foods are so important to maintain a healthy body. If your kids compete in sports, you can teach them why nutrients will make them better athletes. Even if they don’t play sports they can understand that real food is packed with vitamins and minerals that make them stronger, smarter and healthier.Additionally you’ll be able to choose non-GMO foods and support non-GMO farmers.8. Get away from the screensTV screens, computer screens, iPad screens, phone screens- ARghhhh! Yes, I know you are reading this on a screen (unless somebody printed it for you). Screens are awesome but they have their time and place. Food has a huge impact on childhood obesity but at the same time most kids are on their butts too many hours per day.Do we really have to watch Lion King one more time? The Farmers Market is a great excuse to bust away from the TV, or Xbox or Facebook, Instagram, - whatever, and get some fresh air.9. Family bondingyou may end up creating one of those fond memories that your kids can carry and pass on to their kidsA trip to the Farmers Market provides a great way to spend time together as a family. It’s easy to enjoy each others company when you’re doing something healthy. With little kids you can play fun games like finding food that’s different colors or shapes. With older kids try a scavenger hunt and offer a family prize if the goal is hit.It may take a little work (and a bribe or two) but the market can be a fun family outing. Who knows, you may end up creating one of those fond memories that your kids can carry and pass on to their kids. How great would that be!10. Teach the importance of communityThe growing number of farmers markets in the United States gives us hope. They serve not only as a way for people to purchase local food but also as a chance for them to connect with others within their communities. Buying local promotes a sense of pride in you home town. Farmers markets allow you to teach your kids that they can make a difference by voting with their dollars. When you shop at a large grocery store chain, a fraction of your dollars stay local. Supporting local farmers keeps the money in your community where it can be reinvested for the good of the town.Ready to find some farmers markets? Enter your zip code in the search box at the top of the screen! And then you can have your kids help you write reviews of the market so others can benefit as well.
[Source]

1. Develop healthy emotional eating habits.

One of the biggest myths about emotional eating is that it’s prompted by negative feelings. Yes, people often turn to food when they’re stressed out, lonely, sad, anxious, or bored.

It’s no accident that McDonald’s named their kids deal a Happy Meal
But emotional eating can be linked to positive feelings too! It’s no accident that McDonald’s named their kids deal a “Happy Meal”! They do this to form a lifelong emotional bond between being happy and eating at McD’s, and it works!

You can beat the fast food marketing guru’s at their own game. Simply swap out the fast food and replace it with a fun day at the Farmers Market! Do this on a regular basis and your kids will start to equate healthy real food with those happy family days at the market.

Here’s another solution from the Snack-Girl Blog

2. Connect kids with “real food”

There is a huge disconnect between most Americans and their food. For the most part, we’ve stopped questioning where our food comes from, how it is raised and if it is good for our health. To a large extent, this is why our supermarkets shelves are lined with so many boxes of processed junk. And most of it is Genetically Modified (GMOs). We are the ones buying it so they keep making it!

We can break that cycle with our kids and the Farmers Market provides a great opportunity to further the food connection discussion. It’s much more effective when you practice what you preach. Buying from local sustainable farmers reinforces the message.

Want to get involved with stopping GMOs? Take a look at March against Monsanto

3. Talk with real farmers

As you know, kids are naturally curious. This is a good match because farming is really amazing. Think about it: plant seeds in dirt, add water, get vegetables! Of course there’s a lot more to it than that.

As we mentioned above, a lot of the farmers we meet are very proud of the work they do and they’re very happy to talk about it. With a little coaching (if necessary) you’re kids can ask some great questions, like- Why are you a farmer? What’s your favorite things to grow? What’s that hardest thing to grow? The easiest? Do you use chemicals or pesticides? Why, or why not?

A cool side-effect of this is that the next time you go to the market your kids will remember the farmers. It’s great to make new friends, especially when their doing something as important as growing your food.

4. Let them buy their own food

if we really want to teach our kids about the value of real food, they should know how to shop for it
Depending on your kids age(s), give them a few bucks to buy some of their own food to bring home. This in itself is a great learning experience. Will they think long and hard about what to buy? Or will they buy the first thing they see? Learning to shop wisely and consider all the options is a great skill to have.

And let’s be honest, if we really want to teach our kids about the value of real food, they should know how to shop for it!

PS- If you have young kids, instead of actually shopping maybe you can just let them give the money to farmer. Little kids (and the farmer) will probably enjoy this!

5. Cook the food you bought at home

Getting kids involved in cooking is great. Basic cooking skills open so many choices for them later in life and alleviate them of the need to buy ready made, highly processed meals. But it’s not always easy.

Cooking the food you just bought, or the food THEY just bought if you followed the step above, makes this a whole lot easier. It’s the next logical step- “We bought these veggies from the nice farmer, now we get to cook them!”

For meal ideas, check out our friends at Clean Eating Recipes

6. Introduce new foods

Face it, some kids are just picky eaters. The 3 steps above may have a profound effect on their willingness to even TRY something new, right? Let’s go through this- We met the farmer, learned about how they grew this, we bought it, we took it home and now we cooked it. It’s just natural to want to taste it!

For some menu inspiration follow our friends at Just Eat Real Food

7. Learn about nutrition

teach them why nutrients will make them better athletes
For older kids, the Farmers Market provides an opportunity to learn about nutrition and why real foods are so important to maintain a healthy body. If your kids compete in sports, you can teach them why nutrients will make them better athletes. Even if they don’t play sports they can understand that real food is packed with vitamins and minerals that make them stronger, smarter and healthier.

Additionally you’ll be able to choose non-GMO foods and support non-GMO farmers.

8. Get away from the screens

TV screens, computer screens, iPad screens, phone screens- ARghhhh! Yes, I know you are reading this on a screen (unless somebody printed it for you). Screens are awesome but they have their time and place. Food has a huge impact on childhood obesity but at the same time most kids are on their butts too many hours per day.

Do we really have to watch Lion King one more time? The Farmers Market is a great excuse to bust away from the TV, or Xbox or Facebook, Instagram, - whatever, and get some fresh air.

9. Family bonding

you may end up creating one of those fond memories that your kids can carry and pass on to their kids
A trip to the Farmers Market provides a great way to spend time together as a family. It’s easy to enjoy each others company when you’re doing something healthy. With little kids you can play fun games like finding food that’s different colors or shapes. With older kids try a scavenger hunt and offer a family prize if the goal is hit.

It may take a little work (and a bribe or two) but the market can be a fun family outing. Who knows, you may end up creating one of those fond memories that your kids can carry and pass on to their kids. How great would that be!

10. Teach the importance of community

The growing number of farmers markets in the United States gives us hope. They serve not only as a way for people to purchase local food but also as a chance for them to connect with others within their communities. Buying local promotes a sense of pride in you home town. 

Farmers markets allow you to teach your kids that they can make a difference by voting with their dollars. When you shop at a large grocery store chain, a fraction of your dollars stay local. Supporting local farmers keeps the money in your community where it can be reinvested for the good of the town.

Ready to find some farmers markets? Enter your zip code in the search box at the top of the screen! And then you can have your kids help you write reviews of the market so others can benefit as well.

[Source]

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